EURORAD ESR

Case 8952

Inferior mesenteric vein thrombophlebitis in sigmoid diverticulitis

Author(s)
Arora A, Sharma A, Singh S, Kapoor A

Department of Radiodiagnosis, G.B. Pant Hospital and associated Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India.
 
Patient
male, 55 year(s)
 
 
  • Figure 1
    Coronal contrast-enhanced CT scan

    Acute sigmoid diverticulitis (white arrow) complicated by pylephlebitis of the IMV (yellow arrow). IMV is attenuated and shows faint luminal enhancement. Fat stranding around the vessel. Mesocolic lymphadenopathy is...

     
     
     
  • Figure 2
    Coronal contrast-enhanced CT scan

    Attenuated and poorly enhancing IMV (yellow arrow) with associated perivascular fat stranding. Acute sigmoid diverticulitis (white arrow) can also be seen.

     
     
     
  • Figure 3
    Coronal close-up view of IMV

    Attenuated and poorly enhancing IMV associated with perivascular fat stranding. Acute sigmoid diverticulitis is seen inferolaterally.

     
     
     
  • Figure 4
    Axial contrast-enhanced CT scan

    The wall of the IMV is thickened and shows stranding of adjacent fat as a result of thrombosis and inflammation.

     
     
     
  • Figure 5
    Axial close-up view of IMV

    Circumferential fat stranding along the wall of the IMV.

     
     
     
Acute sigmoid diverticulitis (white arrow) complicated by pylephlebitis of the IMV (yellow arrow). IMV is attenuated and shows faint luminal enhancement. Fat stranding around the vessel. Mesocolic lymphadenopathy is also seen.
 
Attenuated and poorly enhancing IMV (yellow arrow) with associated perivascular fat stranding. Acute sigmoid diverticulitis (white arrow) can also be seen.
 
Attenuated and poorly enhancing IMV associated with perivascular fat stranding. Acute sigmoid diverticulitis is seen inferolaterally.
 
The wall of the IMV is thickened and shows stranding of adjacent fat as a result of thrombosis and inflammation.
 
Circumferential fat stranding along the wall of the IMV.
 
 
 
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