EURORAD ESR

Case 8940

The accordion sign in chronic alcoholic liver disease

Author(s)
Arora A, Puri SK, Kapoor A, Upreti L.

Department of Radiodiagnosis, G.B. Pant Hospital and associated Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India.
 
Patient
male, 36 year(s)
 
 
  • Figure 1
    Axial non contrast CT

    Gross fatty infiltration of the liver, mild splenomegaly and mild perihepatic fluid. Also seen is diffusely edematous large bowel.

     
    Area of Interest: Abdomen; Colon; Imaging Technique: CT;
     
     
  • Figure 2
    Axial contrast enhanced CT

    The hyperaemic enhancing mucosa of the colon, stretched over the markedly thickened submucosal folds simulates the accordion sign.

     
    Area of Interest: Abdomen; Colon; Imaging Technique: CT;
     
     
  • Figure 3
    Axial contrast enhanced CT

    The entire large bowel was involved in a contiguous fashion extending from the rectum up to the cecum.

     
    Area of Interest: Abdomen; Colon; Imaging Technique: CT;
     
     
  • Figure 4
    Coronal contrast enhanced CT

    Visualization of the accordion sign in the transverse colon.

     
    Area of Interest: Abdomen; Colon; Imaging Technique: CT;
     
     
  • Figure 5
    Reformatted CT image

    Accordion-like appearance of the ascending, descending and the transverse colon.

     
    Area of Interest: Abdomen; Colon; Imaging Technique: CT;
     
     
  • Figure 6
    The Accordion

    The accordion.

     
     
     
Gross fatty infiltration of the liver, mild splenomegaly and mild perihepatic fluid. Also seen is diffusely edematous large bowel.
 
The hyperaemic enhancing mucosa of the colon, stretched over the markedly thickened submucosal folds simulates the accordion sign.
 
The entire large bowel was involved in a contiguous fashion extending from the rectum up to the cecum.
 
Visualization of the accordion sign in the transverse colon.
 
Accordion-like appearance of the ascending, descending and the transverse colon.
 
The accordion.
 
 
 
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