EURORAD ESR

Case 6852

Colocolic intussusception (invagination) secondary to a lipoma.

Author(s)
José C. Pérez-Tejada1, Francisco Campoy-Balbontín1, Jorge Escalada-Berta1, José Cuaresma-Ferrete2, Willy Pinto-Morales3.
1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Surgery, 3Department of Anatomical Pathology.
Valme University Hospital. Seville. Spain.
 
Patient
male, 28 year(s)
 
 
  • Figure 1
    Contrast enhanced CT.

    CT nicely shows the typical bowel-within-bowel image of intussusception.

     
     
     
  • Figure 2
    Contrast enhanced CT.

    The lead point is a mass with the characteristic attenuation of fat, pathognomonic for lipoma. Note the strong enhancement of the mucosa.

     
     
     
  • Figure 3
    Contrast enhanced CT.

    The lead point is a mass with the characteristic attenuation of fat, pathognomonic for lipoma. Note the strong enhancement of the mucosa.

     
     
     
  • Figure 4
    Laparotomy.

    Intussusception at laparotomy seen from the intussuscipiens.

     
     
     
  • Figure 5
    Piece of the gross specimen of the resected sigmoid colon.

    The intussusception has been reduced and the colon is opened.

     
     
     
  • Figure 6
    Piece of the gross specimen of the resected sigmoid colon.

    The characteristic macroscopic view of a sessile submucosal lipoma is in the centre of the specimen. The mucosa has been resected.

     
     
     
CT nicely shows the typical bowel-within-bowel image of intussusception.
 
The lead point is a mass with the characteristic attenuation of fat, pathognomonic for lipoma. Note the strong enhancement of the mucosa.
 
The lead point is a mass with the characteristic attenuation of fat, pathognomonic for lipoma. Note the strong enhancement of the mucosa.
 
Intussusception at laparotomy seen from the intussuscipiens.
 
The intussusception has been reduced and the colon is opened.
 
The characteristic macroscopic view of a sessile submucosal lipoma is in the centre of the specimen. The mucosa has been resected.
 
 
 
Home Search Sections Teaching Cases History FAQ Case Archives Contact Login Disclaimer Imprint Switch to MOBILE version
View desktop version