EURORAD ESR

Case 3263

Radiation myelopathy

Author(s)
Aribandi AK, Sizer B, Aribandi M
 
Patient
male, 53 year(s)
 
 
  • Published 05.10.2005
  • DOI 10.1594/EURORAD/CASE.3263
  • Section Neuroradiology
  • Case Type Clinical Cases
  • Difficulty Resident
  • Views 1884
  • Language(s)
  • Figure 1
    Radiation necrosis in the cervical cord which has resolved on follow-up and resulted in cord atrophy
     

    A gadolinium-enhanced sagittal T1-weighted MR image of the cervical spine demonstrating an oval shaped ring-enhancing lesion in the cord at the C2 vertebral level.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: Radiation necrosis in the cervical cord which has resolved on followup and resulted in cord atrophy;

    A sagittal T2-weighted MR image obtained 19 months after the initial MRI, demonstrating the resolution of the focal lesion in the cord, and showing evidence of cord atrophy (indicated by an arrow).

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: Radiation necrosis in the cervical cord which has resolved on followup and resulted in cord atrophy;
     
     
  • Figure 2
    Delayed radiation myelopathy in a different patient

    A sagittal T2-weighted MR image in a patient previously irradiated for CSF drop metastases from a cerebellar hemangioblastoma, demonstrating an increased T2 signal in the cord and cord atrophy.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: Delayed radiation myelopathy in a different patient;
     
     
A gadolinium-enhanced sagittal T1-weighted MR image of the cervical spine demonstrating an oval shaped ring-enhancing lesion in the cord at the C2 vertebral level.
 
A sagittal T2-weighted MR image obtained 19 months after the initial MRI, demonstrating the resolution of the focal lesion in the cord, and showing evidence of cord atrophy (indicated by an arrow).
 
A sagittal T2-weighted MR image in a patient previously irradiated for CSF drop metastases from a cerebellar hemangioblastoma, demonstrating an increased T2 signal in the cord and cord atrophy.
 
 
 
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