EURORAD ESR

Case 3001

A rare location of arterial compression in thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS)

Author(s)
Nishida T, Saito T, Sawada S, Mori Y
 
Patient
female, 28 year(s)
 
 
  • Figure 1
    Angiography
     

    A selective left subclavian arteriogram in the neutral position demonstrating that there is no stenotic lesion.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: Angiography;

    A selective left subclavian arteriogram in Allen's position demonstrating an arterial compression at the region of the humeral head.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: Angiography;
     
     
  • Figure 2
    Anatomy

    An image showing the relation between the pectoralis major and the axillary artery.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: Anatomy;
     
     
  • Figure 3
     

    An image showing the axillary artery, the pectoralis minor (green) and the pectoralis major (light green) in the neutral position.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown;

    An image showing the axillary artery, the pectoralis minor (green) and the pectoralis major (light green) in Allen's position. Hyperabduction of the arm produced a compression of the axillary artery beneath the...

     
    Area of Interest: unknown;
     
     
  • Figure 4

    No annotation

     
    Area of Interest: unknown;
     
     
A selective left subclavian arteriogram in the neutral position demonstrating that there is no stenotic lesion.
 
A selective left subclavian arteriogram in Allen's position demonstrating an arterial compression at the region of the humeral head.
 
An image showing the relation between the pectoralis major and the axillary artery.
 
An image showing the axillary artery, the pectoralis minor (green) and the pectoralis major (light green) in the neutral position.
 
An image showing the axillary artery, the pectoralis minor (green) and the pectoralis major (light green) in Allen's position. Hyperabduction of the arm produced a compression of the axillary artery beneath the fibrotic band of the pectoralis major tendon.
 
 
 
 
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