EURORAD ESR

Case 2685

Incudostapedial dislocation

Author(s)
De Temmerman G, Verstraete K
 
Patient
male, 24 year(s)
 
 
  • Published 19.11.2005
  • DOI 10.1594/EURORAD/CASE.2685
  • Section Neuroradiology
  • Case Type Clinical Cases
  • Difficulty Resident
  • Views 8155
  • Language(s)
  • Figure 1
    Axial CT scan of the left ear
     

    Incudostapedial disarticulation. An axial CT-scan of the left ear showing the lenticular process of the incus (2c) pulled away from the head of the stapes (3b). The long process of the incus (2b) is displaced...

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: axial CT of the left ear;

    Incudostapedial disarticulation. An axial CT-scan of the left ear showing the lenticular process of the incus (2c) pulled away from the head of the stapes (3b). The long process of the incus (2b) is displaced...

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: axial CT of the left ear;

    Incudostapedial disarticulation. An axial CT-scan of the left ear shows the lenticular process of the incus (2c) pulled away from the head of the stapes (3b). The long process of the incus (2b) is displaced anteriorly...

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: axial CT of the left ear;
     
     
  • Figure 2
    An axial CT of a normal left ear
     

    Axial CT-sections through the malleoincudal joint (Fig. 2a), the vestibulostapedial joint (Fig. 2b) and the incudostapedial joint (Fig. 2c),showing a normal left ear.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: axial CT of a normal left ear;

    Axial CT-sections through the malleoincudal joint (Fig. 2a), the vestibulostapedial joint (Fig. 2b) and the incudostapedial joint (Fig. 2c), showing a normal left ear.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: axial CT of a normal left ear;

    Axial CT-sections through the malleoincudal joint (Fig. 2a), the vestibulostapedial joint (Fig. 2b) and the incudostapedial joint (Fig. 2c), showing a normal left ear.

     
    Area of Interest: unknown; Imaging Technique: axial CT of a normal left ear;
     
     
  • Figure 3
    Normal incudostapedial joint

    No annotation

     
     
     
  • Figure 4
    Incudostapedial dislocation

    No annotation

     
     
     
Incudostapedial disarticulation. An axial CT-scan of the left ear showing the lenticular process of the incus (2c) pulled away from the head of the stapes (3b). The long process of the incus (2b) is displaced anteriorly and laterally, and faces the manubrium of the malleus (1c). Notice the normal position of the head (1a) and neck (1b) of the malleus, the body of the incus (2a) and the crura of the stapes (3a).
 
Incudostapedial disarticulation. An axial CT-scan of the left ear showing the lenticular process of the incus (2c) pulled away from the head of the stapes (3b). The long process of the incus (2b) is displaced anteriorly and laterally, and faces the manubrium of the malleus (1c). Notice the normal position of the head (1a) and neck (1b) of the malleus, the body of the incus (2a) and the crura of the stapes (3a).
 
Incudostapedial disarticulation. An axial CT-scan of the left ear shows the lenticular process of the incus (2c) pulled away from the head of the stapes (3b). The long process of the incus (2b) is displaced anteriorly and laterally, and faces the manubrium of the malleus (1c). Notice the normal position of the head (1a) and neck (1b) of the malleus, the body of the incus (2a) and the crura of the stapes (3a).
 
Axial CT-sections through the malleoincudal joint (Fig. 2a), the vestibulostapedial joint (Fig. 2b) and the incudostapedial joint (Fig. 2c),showing a normal left ear.
 
Axial CT-sections through the malleoincudal joint (Fig. 2a), the vestibulostapedial joint (Fig. 2b) and the incudostapedial joint (Fig. 2c), showing a normal left ear.
 
Axial CT-sections through the malleoincudal joint (Fig. 2a), the vestibulostapedial joint (Fig. 2b) and the incudostapedial joint (Fig. 2c), showing a normal left ear.
 
 
 
 
 
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