EURORAD ESR

Case 14517

Detachment of the endocyst combined with biliary communicating rupture in hydatid disease

Author(s)
Katerina Manavi, Galateia Skouroumouni, George Papaderakis, Eliza Stavride, Ioannis Petmezaris, Ioannis Tsitouridis

Papageorgiou General Hospital,
Radiology;
Paulou Mela
56429 Thessaloniki, Greece;
Email:galskour@hotmail.com
 
Patient
male, 34 year(s)
 
 
  • Figure 1
    Ultrasound image of hydatid cyst

    US image showing a fluid collection with "floating membranes" representing the detached endocyst.

     
    Area of Interest: Abdomen; Imaging Technique: Ultrasound; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
  • Figure 2
    Contrast-enhanced CT image of hydatid cyst

    CECT image showing ill-defined hepatic cystic mass with septations inside, representing the detached endocyst. Ipsilateral small pleural effusion.

     
    Area of Interest: Liver; Imaging Technique: CT; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
  • Figure 3
    Contrast-enhanced CT image of hydatid cyst

    CECT image showing a single dilated biliary radicle (arrow) adjacent to the ill-defined cystic mass.

     
    Area of Interest: Liver; Imaging Technique: CT; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
  • Figure 4
    Contrast-enhanced T1W image of hydatid cyst

    Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image showing twisted linear structures within the cyst, representing collapsed parasitic membranes ("snake sign").

     
    Area of Interest: Liver; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
  • Figure 5
    T2W image with fat suppresion of a hydatid cyst

    T2-weighted image with fat suppression showing a linear structure adjacent to the cystic mass, representing a single dilated biliary radicle (arrow).

     
    Area of Interest: Liver; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
  • Figure 6
    T2W image with fat suppresion of a hydatid cyst

    T2 weighted image with fat suppression showing a wall defect (arrow) in the anterior aspect of the cystic mass. The low-signal intensity rim is interrupted at this point.

     
    Area of Interest: Liver; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
  • Figure 7
    MRCP image - hydatid cyst

    MRCP image showing communication with the biliary tree (arrow), as well as a small wall defect (arrowhead).

     
    Area of Interest: Liver; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
  • Figure 8
    Follow-up, contract-enhanced CT image of a hydatid cyst

    6-month follow-up CT image showing decrease of the size of the cyst. The margins of the cystic mass are clearly demarcated.

     
    Area of Interest: Liver; Imaging Technique: CT; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
US image showing a fluid collection with "floating membranes" representing the detached endocyst.
 
CECT image showing ill-defined hepatic cystic mass with septations inside, representing the detached endocyst. Ipsilateral small pleural effusion.
 
CECT image showing a single dilated biliary radicle (arrow) adjacent to the ill-defined cystic mass.
 
Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image showing twisted linear structures within the cyst, representing collapsed parasitic membranes ("snake sign").
 
T2-weighted image with fat suppression showing a linear structure adjacent to the cystic mass, representing a single dilated biliary radicle (arrow).
 
T2 weighted image with fat suppression showing a wall defect (arrow) in the anterior aspect of the cystic mass. The low-signal intensity rim is interrupted at this point.
 
MRCP image showing communication with the biliary tree (arrow), as well as a small wall defect (arrowhead).
 
6-month follow-up CT image showing decrease of the size of the cyst. The margins of the cystic mass are clearly demarcated.
 
 
 
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