EURORAD ESR

Case 11775

A rare cause of soft-tissue mass in a hunter: muscular echinococcosis

Author(s)
Rafailidis Vasileios1, Eleftheriadou Mirtsa2, Chrysa Nalmpantidou2, Rafailidis Dimitrios2

1) General Hospital of Katerini,
6 km Katerini-Arona
60100, Katerini, Greece
2) Radiology Department of
“GENNIMATAS” Hospital of Thessaloniki,
Greece
Email:billraf@hotmail.com
 
Patient
male, 58 year(s)
 
 
  • Figure 1
    Ultrasound of the mass
     

    Four serial images forming a composite longitudinal view covering the entire length of the lesion. A predominantly cystic lesion with septa dividing it in multiple smaller cysts can be seen.

     
    Area of Interest: Musculoskeletal system; Imaging Technique: Ultrasound; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;

    A split-screen composite image was used where the two screens were aligned to cover a transverse view. There is a cystic mass divided by septa in round smaller cysts lying in contact with the wall.

     
    Area of Interest: Musculoskeletal system; Imaging Technique: Ultrasound; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Parasites;
     
     
  • Figure 2
    Correlative MRI
     

    Coronal MRI plane showing the mass.

     
    Area of Interest: Musculoskeletal soft tissue; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Infection;

    Axial MRI plane showing the mass.

     
    Area of Interest: Musculoskeletal soft tissue; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Diagnostic procedure; Special Focus: Infection;
     
     
Four serial images forming a composite longitudinal view covering the entire length of the lesion. A predominantly cystic lesion with septa dividing it in multiple smaller cysts can be seen.
 
A split-screen composite image was used where the two screens were aligned to cover a transverse view. There is a cystic mass divided by septa in round smaller cysts lying in contact with the wall.
 
Coronal MRI plane showing the mass.
 
Axial MRI plane showing the mass.
 
 
 
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