EURORAD ESR

Case 11151

Congenital vertebral segmentation abonormality in absence of other malformations

Author(s)
Guglielmo Manenti, Armando Fusco, Mario Raguso, Alessio Bindi, Marco Morini, Giovanni Simonetti

University of Rome Tor Vergata,
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology,
Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy;
Viale Oxford 81, Rome, Italy;
Email:arfus@libero.it
 
Patient
female, 31 year(s)
 
 
  • Figure 1
    Antero-Posterior X-ray projection

    X-ray examination (120 kVp; 320 ms; 100 mA) confirms the diagnosis of scoliosis; the examination showed the presence of a L1 "butterfly" vertebra and an anomalous origin of the left 12th rib from the T11 vertebra.

     
    Area of Interest: Musculoskeletal spine; Imaging Technique: Digital radiography; Procedure: Comparative studies; Special Focus: Motility;
     
     
  • Figure 2
    The MRI examination allows to describe the vertebral malformations
     

    TSE-T2W (TR=3000ms, TE=100ms, FA=90°, MA=672x672) sagittal image shows a L3-L4 vertebral block (segmentation defect), in which it is possible to observe a partial segmentation of upper and lower vertebrae

     
    Area of Interest: Spine; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Comparative studies; Special Focus: Motility;

    TSE-T2W (TR=3000ms, TE=100ms, FA=90°, MA=672x672) coronal image shows a L1 coronal cleft ("butterfly vertebra").

     
    Area of Interest: Spine; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Comparative studies; Special Focus: Motility;
     
     
  • Figure 3
    The T11 morphological dysmorphism studied with MRI and radiographic examination
     

    TSE-T2W (TR=3000ms, TE=100ms, FA=90°, MA=672x672) coronal image magnification shows, in our opinion, the fusion of one of T12 vertebral ossification nucleus with the upper vertebra (full white arrow).

     
    Area of Interest: Spine; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Comparative studies; Special Focus: Motility;

    X-ray (120 kVp; 320 ms; 100 mA) image magnification shows the anomalous origin of the left 12th rib from the T11 vertebra (full white arrow).

     
    Area of Interest: Spine; Imaging Technique: MR; Procedure: Comparative studies; Special Focus: Motility;
     
     
  • Figure 4
    Table 1

    Several attempts have been made to classify CVM, but no classifications include and clearly distinguish all the phenotypes encountered in clinical practice.

     
    Area of Interest: Spine; Imaging Technique: Experimental; Procedure: Comparative studies; Special Focus: Congenital;
     
     
  • Figure 5
    Table 2

    Several studies showed how spinal and spinal cord development is regulated by many genes and mistakes may result in several disorders.

     
    Area of Interest: Spine; Imaging Technique: Experimental; Procedure: Laboratory tests; Special Focus: Genetic defects;
     
     
X-ray examination (120 kVp; 320 ms; 100 mA) confirms the diagnosis of scoliosis; the examination showed the presence of a L1 "butterfly" vertebra and an anomalous origin of the left 12th rib from the T11 vertebra.
 
TSE-T2W (TR=3000ms, TE=100ms, FA=90°, MA=672x672) sagittal image shows a L3-L4 vertebral block (segmentation defect), in which it is possible to observe a partial segmentation of upper and lower vertebrae
 
TSE-T2W (TR=3000ms, TE=100ms, FA=90°, MA=672x672) coronal image shows a L1 coronal cleft ("butterfly vertebra").
 
TSE-T2W (TR=3000ms, TE=100ms, FA=90°, MA=672x672) coronal image magnification shows, in our opinion, the fusion of one of T12 vertebral ossification nucleus with the upper vertebra (full white arrow).
 
X-ray (120 kVp; 320 ms; 100 mA) image magnification shows the anomalous origin of the left 12th rib from the T11 vertebra (full white arrow).
 
Several attempts have been made to classify CVM, but no classifications include and clearly distinguish all the phenotypes encountered in clinical practice.
 
Several studies showed how spinal and spinal cord development is regulated by many genes and mistakes may result in several disorders.
 
 
 
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